Oh, Ye Lovers! A Meditation on Mawlana Rumi and St. John of the Cross

By Avellina Balestri

Word Count: 1255

Rated: G

Summary: A poem about the spiritual expression of love, inspired by Mawlana Rumi and St. John of the Cross.

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Image Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/red-roses-love-natural-beauty-3131349/

 

“The people of the city, young and old
Were all lamenting, crying, sighing loud
The villagers as well as Turks and Greeks,
They tore their shirts from grief for this great man.
‘He was our Jesus!’- thus the Christians spoke.
‘He was our Moses!’ – said the Jews of him…”

~ A contemporary account of Mawlana Rumi’s funeral

“What a wonderful thing it is
For two souls to understand each other,
For they neither lack something to say,
Nor grow tired.”

~ St. Theresa of Avila on her friendship with St. John of the Cross

 

Oh, ye lovers, dance! Whirl as the petals of the rose unfurl and find the Center of all Longing, the Oneness of all Being. Spin as the seasons turn, color melting from one shade to another, ever deepening, as ink upon the parchment forms poetry, formed deeper yet by the pattern within. Let every the every pen be broken save for the feather of Reality’s Breath, fluttering in our chests, blowing through the hollowed out reed, playing the music divine… Read more about Oh, Ye Lovers! A Meditation on Mawlana Rumi and St. John of the Cross

An Apology of an Apology

By Sarah Levesque

Word Count: 4158

Rating: G

Summary: A defense of the Catholic Church’s stance on marriage

Image result for wedding rings

Apology:

  1. A regretful acknowledgement of an offense or failure
  2. A very poor or inadequate example of something
  3. A reasoned argument or writing in justification of something, typically a theory or religious doctrine1

Read more about An Apology of an Apology

On Beauty and Love: The Qualities Central to the Christian Experience

“Because these two things – loveliness of nature and images, loveliness of heart – both struck me in somewhat the same way, as a beauty etched indelibly into the mind, I began to call them “natural beauty” and “moral beauty”, two faces of what we (perhaps subconsciously) desire that is beyond our ordinary, flat experience, beyond the world.”